Adversarial Learning, also known as adversarial training or generative adversarial networks (GANs), is a machine learning framework that involves the training of two neural networks, known as the generator and the discriminator, in a competitive manner. This framework was introduced by Ian Goodfellow and his colleagues in 2014 and has since become a fundamental concept in various areas of artificial intelligence, including image generation, natural language processing, and more.

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Towards Robust Graph Neural Networks via Adversarial Contrastive Learning

Towards Robust Graph Neural Networks via Adversarial Contrastive Learning Graph Neural Network (GNN), as a powerful representation learning model on graph data, attracts much attention across various disciplines. However, recent studies show that GNN is vulnerable to adversarial attacks. How to make GNN more robust? What are the key vulnerabilities in GNN? How to address the vulnerabilities and defend GNN against the adversarial attacks? Adversarial training has shown to be effective in improving the robustness of traditional Deep Neural Networks (DNNs). However, existing adversarial training works mainly focus on the image data, which consists of continuous features, while the features and structures of graph data are often discrete. Moreover, rather than assuming each sample is independent and identically distributed as in DNN, GNN leverages the contextual information across the graph (e.g., neighborhoods of a node). Thus, existing adversarial training techniques cannot be directly applied to defend GNN. In this paper, we propose ContrastNet, an effective adversarial defense framework for GNN. In particular, we propose an adversarial contrastive learning method to train the GNN over the adversarial space. To further improve the robustness of GNN, we investigate the latent vulnerabilities in every component of a GNN encoder and propose corresponding refining strategies. Extensive experiments on three public datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of ContrastNet in improving the robustness of popular GNN variants, such as Graph Convolutional Network and GraphSage, under various types of adversarial attacks.

Domain Adaptive Semantic Segmentation using Weak Labels

Domain Adaptive Semantic Segmentation using Weak Labels We propose a novel framework for domain adaptation in semantic segmentation with image-level weak labels in the target domain. The weak labels may be obtained based on a model prediction for unsupervised domain adaptation (UDA), or from a human oracle in a new weakly-supervised domain adaptation (WDA) paradigm for semantic segmentation. Using weak labels is both practical and useful, since (i) collecting image-level target annotations is comparably cheap in WDA and incurs no cost in UDA, and (ii) it opens the opportunity for category-wise domain alignment. Our framework uses weak labels to enable the interplay between feature alignment and pseudo-labeling, improving both in the process of domain adaptation. Specifically, we develop a weak-label classification module to enforce the network to attend to certain categories, and then use such training signals to guide the proposed category-wise alignment method. In experiments, we show considerable improvements with respect to the existing state-of-the-arts in UDA and present a new benchmark in the WDA setting.

Adversarial Learning of Privacy-Preserving and Task-Oriented Representations

Adversarial Learning of Privacy-Preserving and Task-Oriented Representations Data privacy has emerged as an important issue as data-driven deep learning has been an essential component of modern machine learning systems. For instance, there could be a potential privacy risk of machine learning systems via the model inversion attack, whose goal is to reconstruct the input data from the latent representation of deep networks. Our work aims at learning a privacy-preserving and task-oriented representation to defend against such model inversion attacks. Specifically, we propose an adversarial reconstruction learning framework that prevents the latent representations decoded into original input data. By simulating the expected behavior of adversary, our framework is realized by minimizing the negative pixel reconstruction loss or the negative feature reconstruction (i.e., perceptual distance) loss. We validate the proposed method on face attribute prediction, showing that our method allows protecting visual privacy with a small decrease in utility performance. In addition, we show the utility-privacy trade-off with different choices of hyperparameter for negative perceptual distance loss at training, allowing service providers to determine the right level of privacy-protection with a certain utility performance. Moreover, we provide an extensive study with different selections of features, tasks, and the data to further analyze their influence on privacy protection.