Cheng Zheng is a former Researcher in the Data Science and Systems Security department at NEC Laboratories America, Inc.

Posts

Node Classification in Temporal Graphs through Stochastic Sparsification and Temporal Structural Convolution

Node Classification in Temporal Graphs through Stochastic Sparsification and Temporal Structural Convolution Node classification in temporal graphs aims to predict node labels based on historical observations. In real-world applications, temporal graphs are complex with both graph topology and node attributes evolving rapidly, which poses a high overfitting risk to existing graph learning approaches. In this paper, we propose a novel Temporal Structural Network (TSNet) model, which jointly learns temporal and structural features for node classification from the sparsified temporal graphs. We show that the proposed TSNet learns how to sparsify temporal graphs to favor the subsequent classification tasks and prevent overfitting from complex neighborhood structures. The effective local features are then extracted by simultaneous convolutions in temporal and spatial domains. Using the standard stochastic gradient descent and backpropagation techniques, TSNet iteratively optimizes sparsification and node representations for subsequent classification tasks. Experimental study on public benchmark datasets demonstrates the competitive performance of the proposed model in node classification. Besides, TSNet has the potential to help domain experts to interpret and visualize the learned models.

Robust Graph Representation Learning via Neural Sparsification

Robust Graph Representation Learning via Neural Sparsification Graph representation learning serves as the core of important prediction tasks, ranging from product recommendation to fraud detection. Reallife graphs usually have complex information in the local neighborhood, where each node is described by a rich set of features and connects to dozens or even hundreds of neighbors. Despite the success of neighborhood aggregation in graph neural networks, task-irrelevant information is mixed into nodes’ neighborhood, making learned models suffer from sub-optimal generalization performance. In this paper, we present NeuralSparse, a supervised graph sparsification technique that improves generalization power by learning to remove potentially task-irrelevant edges from input graphs. Our method takes both structural and nonstructural information as input, utilizes deep neural networks to parameterize sparsification processes, and optimizes the parameters by feedback signals from downstream tasks. Under the NeuralSparse framework, supervised graph sparsification could seamlessly connect with existing graph neural networks for more robust performance. Experimental results on both benchmark and private datasets show that NeuralSparse can yield up to 7.2% improvement in testing accuracy when working with existing graph neural networks on node classification tasks.

Learning Deep Network Representations with Adversarially Regularized Autoencoders

Learning Deep Network Representations with Adversarially Regularized Autoencoders The problem of network representation learning, also known as network embedding, arises in many machine learning tasks assuming that there exist a small number of variabilities in the vertex representations which can capture the “semantics” of the original network structure. Most existing network embedding models, with shallow or deep architectures, learn vertex representations from the sampled vertex sequences such that the low-dimensional embeddings preserve the locality property and/or global reconstruction capability. The resultant representations, however, are difficult for model generalization due to the intrinsic sparsity of sampled sequences from the input network. As such, an ideal approach to address the problem is to generate vertex representations by learning a probability density function over the sampled sequences. However, in many cases, such a distribution in a low-dimensional manifold may not always have an analytic form. In this study, we propose to learn the network representations with adversarially regularized autoencoders (NetRA). NetRA learns smoothly regularized vertex representations that well capture the network structure through jointly considering both locality-preserving and global reconstruction constraints. The joint inference is encapsulated in a generative adversarial training process to circumvent the requirement of an explicit prior distribution, and thus obtains better generalization performance. We demonstrate empirically how well key properties of the network structure are captured and the effectiveness of NetRA on a variety of tasks, including network reconstruction, link prediction, and multi-label classification.