Contrastive Learning is a machine learning technique that aims to learn representations of data by contrasting similar and dissimilar pairs of examples. The primary goal of contrastive learning is to project data points into a feature space such that similar data points are brought closer together while dissimilar data points are pushed farther apart.

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AutoTCL: Automated Time Series Contrastive Learning with Adaptive Augmentations

Read AutoTCL: Automated Time Series Contrastive Learning with Adaptive Augmentations publication. Modern techniques like contrastive learning have been effectively used in many areas, including computer vision, natural language processing, and graph-structured data. Creating positive examples that assist the model in learning robust and discriminative representations is a crucial stage in contrastive learning approaches. Usually, preset human intuition directs the selection of relevant data augmentations. Due to patterns that are easily recognized by humans, this rule of thumb works well in the vision and language domains. However, it is impractical to visually inspect the temporal structures in time series. The diversity of time series augmentations at both the dataset and instance levels makes it difficult to choose meaningful augmentations on the fly. Thus, although prevalent, contrastive learning with data augmentation has been less studied in the time series domain. In this study, we address this gap by analyzing time series data augmentation using information theory and summarizing the most commonly adopted augmentations in a unified format. We then propose a parameterized augmentation method, AutoTCL, which can be adaptively employed to support time series representation learning. The proposed approach is encoder-agnostic, allowing it to be seamlessly integrated with different backbone encoders. Experiments on benchmark datasets demonstrate the highly competitive results of our method, with an average 10.3% reduction in MSE and 7.0% in MAE over the leading baselines.

Utility Pole Localization by Learning From Ambient Traces on Distributed Acoustic Sensing

Utility pole detection and localization is the most fundamental application in aerial-optic cables using distributed acoustic sensing (DAS). The existing pole localization method recognizes the hammer knock signal on DAS traces by learning from knocking vibration patterns. However, it requires many efforts for data collection such as knocking every pole and manually labeling the poles’ locations, making this labor-intensive solution expensive, inefficient, and highly error prone. In this paper, we propose a pole localization solution by learning the ambient data collected from a DAS system, which are vibration patterns excited by random ambient events, such as wind and nearby traffic. In detail, we investigate a universal framework for learning representations of ambient data in the frequency domain by contrastive learning of the similarity of low and high-frequency series. A Gaussian-based data reweighting kernel is employed for eliminating the effect of the label noise. Experimental results demonstrate the proposed methods outperform the existing contrastive learning methods on the real-world DAS ambient dataset.

Towards Robust Graph Neural Networks via Adversarial Contrastive Learning

Graph Neural Network (GNN), as a powerful representation learning model on graph data, attracts much attention across various disciplines. However, recent studies show that GNN is vulnerable to adversarial attacks. How to make GNN more robust? What are the key vulnerabilities in GNN? How to address the vulnerabilities and defend GNN against the adversarial attacks? Adversarial training has shown to be effective in improving the robustness of traditional Deep Neural Networks (DNNs). However, existing adversarial training works mainly focus on the image data, which consists of continuous features, while the features and structures of graph data are often discrete. Moreover, rather than assuming each sample is independent and identically distributed as in DNN, GNN leverages the contextual information across the graph (e.g., neighborhoods of a node). Thus, existing adversarial training techniques cannot be directly applied to defend GNN. In this paper, we propose ContrastNet, an effective adversarial defense framework for GNN. In particular, we propose an adversarial contrastive learning method to train the GNN over the adversarial space. To further improve the robustness of GNN, we investigate the latent vulnerabilities in every component of a GNN encoder and propose corresponding refining strategies. Extensive experiments on three public datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of ContrastNet in improving the robustness of popular GNN variants, such as Graph Convolutional Network and GraphSage, under various types of adversarial attacks.

Self-supervised Video Representation Learning with Cascade Positive Retrieval

Self-supervised video representation learning has been shown to effectively improve downstream tasks such as video retrieval and action recognition. In this paper, we present the Cascade Positive Retrieval (CPR) that successively mines positive examples w.r.t. the query for contrastive learning in a cascade of stages. Specifically, CPR exploits multiple views of a query example in different modalities, where an alternative view may help find another positive example dissimilar in the query view. We explore the effects of possible CPR configurations in ablations including the number of mining stages, the top similar example selection ratio in each stage, and progressive training with an incremental number of the final Top-k selection. The overall mining quality is measured to reflect the recall across training set classes. CPR reaches a median class mining recall of 83.3%, outperforming previous work by 5.5%. Implementation-wise, CPR is complementary to pretext tasks and can be easily applied to previous work. In the evaluation of pretraining on UCF101, CPR consistently improves existing work and even achieves state-of-the-art R@1 of 56.7% and 24.4% in video retrieval as well as 83.8% and 54.8% in action recognition on UCF101 and HMDB51. The code is available at https://github.com/necla-ml/CPR.

InfoGCL: Information-Aware Graph Contrastive Learning

InfoGCL: Information-Aware Graph Contrastive Learning Various graph contrastive learning models have been proposed to improve the performance of tasks on graph datasets in recent years. While effective and prevalent, these models are usually carefully customized. In particular, despite all recent work create two contrastive views, they differ in a variety of view augmentations, architectures, and objectives. It remains an open question how to build your graph contrastive learning model from scratch for particular graph tasks and datasets. In this work, we aim to fill this gap by studying how graph information is transformed and transferred during the contrastive learning process, and proposing an information-aware graph contrastive learning framework called InfoGCL. The key to the success of the proposed framework is to follow the Information Bottleneck principle to reduce the mutual information between contrastive parts while keeping task-relevant information intact at both the levels of the individual module and the entire framework so that the information loss during graph representation learning can be minimized. We show for the first time that all recent graph contrastive learning methods can be unified by our framework. Based on theoretical and empirical analysis on benchmark graph datasets, we show that InfoGCL achieves state-of-the-art performance in the settings of both graph classification and node classification tasks.

Learning Cross-Modal Contrastive Features for Video Domain Adaptation

Learning transferable and domain adaptive feature representations from videos is important for video-relevant tasks such as action recognition. Existing video domain adaptation methods mainly rely on adversarial feature alignment, which has been derived from the RGB image space. However, video data is usually associated with multi-modal information, e.g., RGB and optical flow, and thus it remains a challenge to design a better method that considers the cross-modal inputs under the cross-domain adaptation setting. To this end, we propose a unified framework for video domain adaptation, which simultaneously regularizes cross-modal and cross-domain feature representations. Specifically, we treat each modality in a domain as a view and leverage the contrastive learning technique with properly designed sampling strategies. As a result, our objectives regularize feature spaces, which originally lack the connection across modalities or have less alignment across domains. We conduct experiments on domain adaptive action recognition benchmark datasets, i.e., UCF, HMDB, and EPIC-Kitchens, and demonstrate the effectiveness of our components against state-of-the-art algorithms.