Graph Representation Learning is a subfield of representation learning that deals specifically with data structured as graphs. Graphs consist of nodes and edges, where nodes represent entities, and edges represent relationships between them. In graph representation learning, the aim is to learn meaningful representations of nodes or entire subgraphs (e.g., communities) that capture important structural and relational information. These learned representations can be used for tasks like node classification, link prediction, and community detection in graphs.

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Towards Robust Graph Neural Networks via Adversarial Contrastive Learning

Towards Robust Graph Neural Networks via Adversarial Contrastive Learning Graph Neural Network (GNN), as a powerful representation learning model on graph data, attracts much attention across various disciplines. However, recent studies show that GNN is vulnerable to adversarial attacks. How to make GNN more robust? What are the key vulnerabilities in GNN? How to address the vulnerabilities and defend GNN against the adversarial attacks? Adversarial training has shown to be effective in improving the robustness of traditional Deep Neural Networks (DNNs). However, existing adversarial training works mainly focus on the image data, which consists of continuous features, while the features and structures of graph data are often discrete. Moreover, rather than assuming each sample is independent and identically distributed as in DNN, GNN leverages the contextual information across the graph (e.g., neighborhoods of a node). Thus, existing adversarial training techniques cannot be directly applied to defend GNN. In this paper, we propose ContrastNet, an effective adversarial defense framework for GNN. In particular, we propose an adversarial contrastive learning method to train the GNN over the adversarial space. To further improve the robustness of GNN, we investigate the latent vulnerabilities in every component of a GNN encoder and propose corresponding refining strategies. Extensive experiments on three public datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of ContrastNet in improving the robustness of popular GNN variants, such as Graph Convolutional Network and GraphSage, under various types of adversarial attacks.

DeepGAR: Deep Graph Learning for Analogical Reasoning

DeepGAR: Deep Graph Learning for Analogical Reasoning Analogical reasoning is the process of discovering and mapping correspondences from a target subject to a base subject. As the most well-known computational method of analogical reasoning, Structure-Mapping Theory (SMT) abstracts both target and base subjects into relational graphs and forms the cognitive process of analogical reasoning by finding a corresponding subgraph (i.e., correspondence) in the target graph that is aligned with the base graph. However, incorporating deep learning for SMT is still under-explored due to several obstacles: 1) the combinatorial complexity of searching for the correspondence in the target graph, 2) the correspondence mining is restricted by various cognitive theory-driven constraints. To address both challenges, we propose a novel framework for Analogical Reasoning (DeepGAR) that identifies the correspondence between source and target domains by assuring cognitive theory-driven constraints. Specifically, we design a geometric constraint embedding space to induce subgraph relation from node embeddings for efficient subgraph search. Furthermore, we develop novel learning and optimization strategies that could end-to-end identify correspondences that are strictly consistent with constraints driven by the cognitive theory. Extensive experiments are conducted on synthetic and real-world datasets to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed DeepGAR over existing methods. The code and data are available at: https://github.com/triplej0079/DeepGAR.

Robust Graph Representation Learning via Neural Sparsification

Robust Graph Representation Learning via Neural Sparsification Graph representation learning serves as the core of important prediction tasks, ranging from product recommendation to fraud detection. Reallife graphs usually have complex information in the local neighborhood, where each node is described by a rich set of features and connects to dozens or even hundreds of neighbors. Despite the success of neighborhood aggregation in graph neural networks, task-irrelevant information is mixed into nodes’ neighborhood, making learned models suffer from sub-optimal generalization performance. In this paper, we present NeuralSparse, a supervised graph sparsification technique that improves generalization power by learning to remove potentially task-irrelevant edges from input graphs. Our method takes both structural and nonstructural information as input, utilizes deep neural networks to parameterize sparsification processes, and optimizes the parameters by feedback signals from downstream tasks. Under the NeuralSparse framework, supervised graph sparsification could seamlessly connect with existing graph neural networks for more robust performance. Experimental results on both benchmark and private datasets show that NeuralSparse can yield up to 7.2% improvement in testing accuracy when working with existing graph neural networks on node classification tasks.

Inductive and Unsupervised Representation Learning on Graph Structured Objects

Inductive and Unsupervised Representation Learning on Graph Structured Objects Inductive and unsupervised graph learning is a critical technique for predictive or information retrieval tasks where label information is difficult to obtain. It is also challenging to make graph learning inductive and unsupervised at the same time, as learning processes guided by reconstruction error based loss functions inevitably demand graph similarity evaluation that is usually computationally intractable. In this paper, we propose a general framework SEED (Sampling, Encoding, and Embedding Distributions) for inductive and unsupervised representation learning on graph structured objects. Instead of directly dealing with the computational challenges raised by graph similarity evaluation, given an input graph, the SEED framework samples a number of subgraphs whose reconstruction errors could be efficiently evaluated, encodes the subgraph samples into a collection of subgraph vectors, and employs the embedding of the subgraph vector distribution as the output vector representation for the input graph. By theoretical analysis, we demonstrate the close connection between SEED and graph isomorphism. Using public benchmark datasets, our empirical study suggests the proposed SEED framework is able to achieve up to 10% improvement, compared with competitive baseline methods.

A Generic Edge-Empowered Graph Convolutional Network via Node-Edge Mutual Enhancement

A Generic Edge-Empowered Graph Convolutional Network via Node-Edge Mutual Enhancement Graph Convolutional Networks (GCNs) have shown to be a powerful tool for analyzing graph-structured data. Most of previous GCN methods focus on learning a good node representation by aggregating the representations of neighboring nodes, whereas largely ignoring the edge information. Although few recent methods have been proposed to integrate edge attributes into GCNs to initialize edge embeddings, these methods do not work when edge attributes are (partially) unavailable. Can we develop a generic edge-empowered framework to exploit node-edge enhancement, regardless of the availability of edge attributes? In this paper, we propose a novel framework EE-GCN that achieves node-edge enhancement. In particular, the framework EE-GCN includes three key components: (i) Initialization: this step is to initialize the embeddings of both nodes and edges. Unlike node embedding initialization, we propose a line graph-based method to initialize the embedding of edges regardless of edge attributes. (ii) Feature space alignment: we propose a translation-based mapping method to align edge embedding with node embedding space, and the objective function is penalized by a translation loss when both spaces are not aligned. (iii) Node-edge mutually enhanced updating: node embedding is updated by aggregating embedding of neighboring nodes and associated edges, while edge embedding is updated by the embedding of associated nodes and itself. Through the above improvements, our framework provides a generic strategy for all of the spatial-based GCNs to allow edges to participate in embedding computation and exploit node-edge mutual enhancement. Finally, we present extensive experimental results to validate the improved performances of our method in terms of node classification, link prediction, and graph classification.

Learning Robust Representations with Graph Denoising Policy Network

Learning Robust Representations with Graph Denoising Policy Network Existing representation learning methods based on graph neural networks and their variants rely on the aggregation of neighborhood information, which makes it sensitive to noises in the graph, e.g. erroneous links between nodes, incorrect/missing node features. In this paper, we propose Graph Denoising Policy Network (short for GDPNet) to learn robust representations from noisy graph data through reinforcement learning. GDPNet first selects signal neighborhoods for each node, and then aggregates the information from the selected neighborhoods to learn node representations for the down-stream tasks. Specifically, in the signal neighborhood selection phase, GDPNet optimizes the neighborhood for each target node by formulating the process of removing noisy neighborhoods as a Markov decision process and learning a policy with task-specific rewards received from the representation learning phase. In the representation learning phase, GDPNet aggregates features from signal neighbors to generate node representations for down-stream tasks, and provides task-specific rewards to the signal neighbor selection phase. These two phases are jointly trained to select optimal sets of neighbors for target nodes with maximum cumulative task-specific rewards, and to learn robust representations for nodes. Experimental results on node classification task demonstrate the effectiveness of GDNet, outperforming the state-of-the-art graph representation learning methods on several well-studied datasets.