Optical Communication refers to the technology and method of transmitting information using light signals. In this form of communication, data is encoded into optical signals (light pulses), and these signals are transmitted through various mediums, such as optical fibers or free space. Optical communication is known for its high data transfer rates, low signal attenuation, and resistance to electromagnetic interference, making it widely used in telecommunications, data centers, and other applications.

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More Than Communications: Environment Monitoring Using Existing Data Center Network Infrastructure

More Than Communications: Environment Monitoring Using Existing Data Center Network Infrastructure We propose reusing existing optical cables in metropolitan networks for distributed sensing using a bidirectional, dual-band architecture where communications and sensing signals can coexist with weak interaction on the same optical fiber.

Size and Alignment Independent Classification of the High-order Spatial Modes of a Light Beam Using a Convolutional Neural Network

Size and Alignment Independent Classification of the High-order Spatial Modes of a Light Beam Using a Convolutional Neural Network The higher-order spatial modes of a light beam are receiving significant interest. They can be used to further increase the data speeds of high speed optical communication, and for novel optical sensing modalities. As such, the classification of higher-order spatial modes is ubiquitous. Canonical classification methods typically require the use of unconventional optical devices. However, in addition to having prohibitive cost, complexity, and efficacy, such methods are dependent on the light beam’s size and alignment. In this work, a novel method to classify higher-order spatial modes is presented, where a convolutional neural network is applied to images of higher-order spatial modes that are taken with a conventional camera. In contrast to previous methods, by training the convolutional neural network with higher-order spatial modes of various alignments and sizes, this method is not dependent on the light beam’s size and alignment. As a proof of principle, images of 4 Hermite-Gaussian modes (HG00, HG01, HG10, and HG11) are numerically calculated via known solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation, and used to synthesize training examples. It is shown that as compared to training the convolutional neural network with training examples that have the same sizes and alignments, a?~2×?increase in accuracy can be achieved.

First Field Trial of Sensing Vehicle Speed, Density, and Road Conditions by Using Fiber Carrying High Speed Data

First Field Trial of Sensing Vehicle Speed, Density, and Road Conditions by Using Fiber Carrying High Speed Data For the first time, we demonstrate detection of vehicle speed, density, and road conditions using deployed fiber carrying high-speed data transmission, and prove carriers’ large-scale fiber infrastructures can also be used as ubiquitous sensing networks.

The Resilience of Hermite- and Laguerre-Gaussian Modes in Turbulence

The Resilience of Hermite- and Laguerre-Gaussian Modes in Turbulence Vast geographical distances in Africa are a leading cause for the so-called digital divide due to the high cost of installing fiber. Free-space optical (FSO) communications offer a convenient and higher bandwidth alternative to point-to-point radio microwave links, with the possibility of repurposing existing infrastructure. Unfortunately, the range of high-bandwidth FSO remains limited. While there has been extensive research into an optimal mode set for FSO to achieve maximum data throughput by mode division multiplexing, there has been relatively little work investigating optical modes to improve the resilience of FSO links. Here, we experimentally show that a carefully chosen subset of Hermite-Gaussian modes is more resilient to atmospheric turbulence than similar Laguerre-Gauss beams, with a predicted upper bound increase in propagation distance of 167% at a mode-dependent loss of 50%.