Posts

Domain Generalization Guided by Gradient Signal to Noise Ratio of Parameters

Overfitting to the source domain is a common issue in gradient-based training of deep neural networks. To compensate for the over-parameterized models, numerous regularization techniques have been introduced such as those based on dropout. While these methods achieve significant improvements on classical benchmarks such as ImageNet, their performance diminishes with the introduction of domain shift in the test set i.e. when the unseen data comes from a significantly different distribution. In this paper, we move away from the classical approach of Bernoulli sampled dropout mask construction and propose to base the selection on gradient-signal-to-noise ratio (GSNR) of network’s parameters. Specifically, at each training step, parameters with high GSNR will be discarded. Furthermore, we alleviate the burden of manually searching for the optimal dropout ratio by leveraging a meta-learning approach. We evaluate our method on standard domain generalization benchmarks and achieve competitive results on classification and face anti-spoofing problems.

Learning Semantic Segmentation from Multiple Datasets with Label Shifts

While it is desirable to train segmentation models on an aggregation of multiple datasets, a major challenge is that the label space of each dataset may be in conflict with one another. To tackle this challenge, we propose UniSeg, an effective and model-agnostic approach to automatically train segmentation models across multiple datasets with heterogeneous label spaces, without requiring any manual relabeling efforts. Specifically, we introduce two new ideas that account for conflicting and co-occurring labels to achieve better generalization performance in unseen domains. First, we identify a gradient conflict in training incurred by mismatched label spaces and propose a class-independent binary cross-entropy loss to alleviate such label conflicts. Second, we propose a loss function that considers class-relationships across datasets for a better multi-dataset training scheme. Extensive quantitative and qualitative analyses on road-scene datasets show that UniSeg improves over multi-dataset baselines, especially on unseen datasets, e.g., achieving more than 8%p gain in IoU on KITTI. Furthermore, UniSeg achieves 39.4% IoU on the WildDash2 public benchmark, making it one of the strongest submissions in the zero-shot setting. Our project page is available at https://www.nec-labs.com/~mas/UniSeg.

On Generalizing Beyond Domains in Cross-Domain Continual Learning

Humans have the ability to accumulate knowledge of new tasks in varying conditions, but deep neural networks of-ten suffer from catastrophic forgetting of previously learned knowledge after learning a new task. Many recent methods focus on preventing catastrophic forgetting under the assumption of train and test data following similar distributions. In this work, we consider a more realistic scenario of continual learning under domain shifts where the model must generalize its inference to an unseen domain. To this end, we encourage learning semantically meaningful features by equipping the classifier with class similarity metrics as learning parameters which are obtained through Mahalanobis similarity computations. Learning of the backbone representation along with these extra parameters is done seamlessly in an end-to-end manner. In addition, we propose an approach based on the exponential moving average of the parameters for better knowledge distillation. We demonstrate that, to a great extent, existing continual learning algorithms fail to handle the forgetting issue under multiple distributions, while our proposed approach learns new tasks under domain shift with accuracy boosts up to 10% on challenging datasets such as DomainNet and OfficeHome.

MM-TTA: Multi-Modal Test-Time Adaptation for 3D Semantic Segmentation

Test-time adaptation approaches have recently emerged as a practical solution for handling domain shift without access to the source domain data. In this paper, we propose and explore a new multi-modal extension of test-time adaptation for 3D semantic segmentation. We find that, directly applying existing methods usually results in performance instability at test time, because multi-modal input is not considered jointly. To design a framework that can take full advantage of multi-modality, where each modality provides regularized self-supervisory signals to other modalities, we propose two complementary modules within and across the modalities. First, Intra-modal Pseudo-label Generation (Intra-PG) is introduced to obtain reliable pseudo labels within each modality by aggregating information from two models that are both pre-trained on source data but updated with target data at different paces. Second, Inter-modal Pseudo-label Refinement (Inter-PR) adaptively selects more reliable pseudo labels from different modalities based on a proposed consistency scheme. Experiments demonstrate that our regularized pseudo labels produce stable self-learning signals in numerous multi-modal test-time adaptation scenarios for 3D semantic segmentation. Visit our project website at https://www.nec-labs.com/~mas/MM-TTA

Learning to Learn across Diverse Data Biases in Deep Face Recognition

Convolutional Neural Networks have achieved remarkable success in face recognition, in part due to the abundant availability of data. However, the data used for training CNNs is often imbalanced. Prior works largely focus on the long-tailed nature of face datasets in data volume per identity or focus on single bias variation. In this paper, we show that many bias variations such as ethnicity, head pose, occlusion and blur can jointly affect the accuracy significantly. We propose a sample level weighting approach termed Multi-variation Cosine Margin (MvCoM), to simultaneously consider the multiple variation factors, which orthogonally enhances the face recognition losses to incorporate the importance of training samples. Further, we leverage a learning to learn approach, guided by a held-out meta learning set and use an additive modeling to predict the MvCoM. Extensive experiments on challenging face recognition benchmarks demonstrate the advantages of our method in jointly handling imbalances due to multiple variations.

Learning Cross-Modal Contrastive Features for Video Domain Adaptation

Learning transferable and domain adaptive feature representations from videos is important for video-relevant tasks such as action recognition. Existing video domain adaptation methods mainly rely on adversarial feature alignment, which has been derived from the RGB image space. However, video data is usually associated with multi-modal information, e.g., RGB and optical flow, and thus it remains a challenge to design a better method that considers the cross-modal inputs under the cross-domain adaptation setting. To this end, we propose a unified framework for video domain adaptation, which simultaneously regularizes cross-modal and cross-domain feature representations. Specifically, we treat each modality in a domain as a view and leverage the contrastive learning technique with properly designed sampling strategies. As a result, our objectives regularize feature spaces, which originally lack the connection across modalities or have less alignment across domains. We conduct experiments on domain adaptive action recognition benchmark datasets, i.e., UCF, HMDB, and EPIC-Kitchens, and demonstrate the effectiveness of our components against state-of-the-art algorithms.

Cross-Domain Similarity Learning for Face Recognition in Unseen Domains

Face recognition models trained under the assumption of identical training and test distributions often suffer from poor generalization when faced with unknown variations, such as a novel ethnicity or unpredictable individual make-ups during test time. In this paper, we introduce a novel cross-domain metric learning loss, which we dub Cross-Domain Triplet (CDT) loss, to improve face recognition in unseen domains. The CDT loss encourages learning semantically meaningful features by enforcing compact feature clusters of identities from one domain, where the compactness is measured by underlying similarity metrics that belong to another training domain with different statistics. Intuitively, it discriminatively correlates explicit metrics derived from one domain, with triplet samples from another domain in a unified loss function to be minimized within a network, which leads to better alignment of the training domains. The network parameters are further enforced to learn generalized features under domain shift, in a model-agnostic learning pipeline. Unlike the recent work of Meta Face Recognition [18], our method does not require careful hard-pair sample mining and filtering strategy during training. Extensive experiments on various face recognition benchmarks show the superiority of our method in handling variations, compared to baseline and the state-of-the-art methods.

Adaptation Across Extreme Variations using Unlabeled Bridges

We tackle an unsupervised domain adaptation problem for which the domain discrepancy between labeled source and unlabeled target domains is large, due to many factors of inter- and intra-domain variation. While deep domain adaptation methods have been realized by reducing the domain discrepancy, these are difficult to apply when domains are significantly different. We propose to decompose domain discrepancy into multiple but smaller, and thus easier to minimize, discrepancies by introducing unlabeled bridging domains that connect the source and target domains. We realize our proposed approach through an extension of the domain adversarial neural network with multiple discriminators, each of which accounts for reducing discrepancies between unlabeled (bridge, target) domains and a mix of all precedent domains including source. We validate the effectiveness of our method on several adaptation tasks including object recognition and semantic segmentation.

Improving Face Recognition by Clustering Unlabeled Faces in the Wild

While deep face recognition has benefited significantly from large-scale labeled data, current research is focused on leveraging unlabeled data to further boost performance, reducing the cost of human annotation. Prior work has mostly been in controlled settings, where the labeled and unlabeled data sets have no overlapping identities by construction. This is not realistic in large-scale face recognition, where one must contend with such overlaps, the frequency of which increases with the volume of data. Ignoring identity overlap leads to significant labeling noise, as data from the same identity is split into multiple clusters. To address this, we propose a novel identity separation method based on extreme value theory. It is formulated as an out-of-distribution detection algorithm, and greatly reduces the problems caused by overlapping-identity label noise. Considering cluster assignments as pseudo-labels, we must also overcome the labeling noise from clustering errors. We propose a modulation of the cosine loss, where the modulation weights correspond to an estimate of clustering uncertainty. Extensive experiments on both controlled and real settings demonstrate our method’s consistent improvements over supervised baselines, e.g., 11.6% improvement on IJB-A verification.

Domain Adaptive Semantic Segmentation using Weak Labels

We propose a novel framework for domain adaptation in semantic segmentation with image-level weak labels in the target domain. The weak labels may be obtained based on a model prediction for unsupervised domain adaptation (UDA), or from a human oracle in a new weakly-supervised domain adaptation (WDA) paradigm for semantic segmentation. Using weak labels is both practical and useful, since (i) collecting image-level target annotations is comparably cheap in WDA and incurs no cost in UDA, and (ii) it opens the opportunity for category-wise domain alignment. Our framework uses weak labels to enable the interplay between feature alignment and pseudo-labeling, improving both in the process of domain adaptation. Specifically, we develop a weak-label classification module to enforce the network to attend to certain categories, and then use such training signals to guide the proposed category-wise alignment method. In experiments, we show considerable improvements with respect to the existing state-of-the-arts in UDA and present a new benchmark in the WDA setting.