Visual Reasoning refers to the capacity of models to analyze and understand visual information in conjunction with natural language. These models integrate both visual and linguistic modalities to perform tasks that require reasoning about the content present in images or videos. Large Vision-Language Models typically leverage advanced neural network architectures and are pre-trained on massive datasets to learn intricate patterns, relationships, and representations of visual and textual data.

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Q: How to Specialize Large Vision-Language Models to Data-Scarce VQA Tasks? A: Self-Train on Unlabeled Images!

Q: How to Specialize Large Vision-Language Models to Data-Scarce VQA Tasks? A: Self-Train on Unlabeled Images! Finetuning a large vision language model (VLM) on a target dataset after large scale pretraining is a dominant paradigm in visual question answering (VQA). Datasets for specialized tasks such as knowledge-based VQA or VQA in non natural-image domains are orders of magnitude smaller than those for general-purpose VQA. While collecting additional labels for specialized tasks or domains can be challenging, unlabeled images are often available. We introduce SelTDA (Self-Taught Data Augmentation), a strategy for finetuning large VLMs on small-scale VQA datasets. SelTDA uses the VLM and target dataset to build a teacher model that can generate question-answer pseudolabels directly conditioned on an image alone, allowing us to pseudolabel unlabeled images. SelTDA then finetunes the initial VLM on the original dataset augmented with freshly pseudolabeled images. We describe a series of experiments showing that our self-taught data augmentation increases robustness to adversarially searched questions, counterfactual examples, and rephrasings, it improves domain generalization, and results in greater retention of numerical reasoning skills. The proposed strategy requires no additional annotations or architectural modifications, and is compatible with any modern encoder-decoder multimodal transformer. Code available at https://github.com/codezakh/SelTDA

Real-time ConcealedWeapon Detection on 3D Radar Images forWalk-through Screening System

Real-time ConcealedWeapon Detection on 3D Radar Images forWalk-through Screening System This paper presents a framework for real-time concealed weapon detection (CWD) on 3D radar images for walk-through screening systems. The walk-through screening system aims to ensure security in crowded areas by performing CWD on walking persons, hence it requires an accurate and real-time detection approach. To ensure accuracy, a weapon needs to be detected irrespective of its 3D orientation, thus we use the 3D radar images as detection input. For achieving real-time, we reformulate classic U-Net based segmentation networks to perform 3D detection tasks. Our 3D segmentation network predicts peak-shaped probability map, instead of voxel-wise masks, to enable position inference by elementary peak detection operation on the predicted map. In the peak-shaped probability map, the peak marks the weapon’s position. So, weapon detection task translates to peak detection on the probability map. A Gaussian function is used to model weapons in the probability map. We experimentally validate our approach on realistic 3D radar images obtained from a walk-through weapon screening system prototype. Extensive ablation studies verify the effectiveness of our proposed approach over existing conventional approaches. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed approach can perform accurate and real-time CWD, thus making it suitable for practical applications of walk-through screening.

Hopper: Multi-hop Transformer for Spatio-Temporal Reasoning

Hopper: Multi-hop Transformer for Spatio-Temporal Reasoning This paper considers the problem of spatiotemporal object-centric reasoning in videos. Central to our approach is the notion of object permanence, i.e., the ability to reason about the location of objects as they move through the video while being occluded, contained or carried by other objects. Existing deep learning based approaches often suffer from spatiotemporal biases when applied to video reasoning problems. We propose Hopper, which uses a Multi-hop Transformer for reasoning object permanence in videos. Given a video and a localization query, Hopper reasons over image and object tracks to automatically hop over critical frames in an iterative fashion to predict the final position of the object of interest. We demonstrate the effectiveness of using a contrastive loss to reduce spatiotemporal biases. We evaluate over CATER dataset and find that Hopper achieves 73.2% Top-1 accuracy using just 1 FPS by hopping through just a few critical frames. We also demonstrate Hopper can perform long-term reasoning by building a CATER-h dataset that requires multi-step reasoning to localize objects of interest correctly.