Domain Generalization is a machine learning paradigm that addresses the challenge of training models to perform well on new, unseen domains that were not present in the training data. In other words, the goal is to develop models that can generalize across a wide range of distributional shifts or changes in input data characteristics.

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Domain Generalization Guided by Gradient Signal to Noise Ratio of Parameters

Overfitting to the source domain is a common issue in gradient-based training of deep neural networks. To compensate for the over-parameterized models, numerous regularization techniques have been introduced such as those based on dropout. While these methods achieve significant improvements on classical benchmarks such as ImageNet, their performance diminishes with the introduction of domain shift in the test set i.e. when the unseen data comes from a significantly different distribution. In this paper, we move away from the classical approach of Bernoulli sampled dropout mask construction and propose to base the selection on gradient-signal-to-noise ratio (GSNR) of network’s parameters. Specifically, at each training step, parameters with high GSNR will be discarded. Furthermore, we alleviate the burden of manually searching for the optimal dropout ratio by leveraging a meta-learning approach. We evaluate our method on standard domain generalization benchmarks and achieve competitive results on classification and face anti-spoofing problems.

Provable Adaptation Across Multiway Domains via Representation Learning

Provable Adaptation Across Multiway Domains via Representation Learning This paper studies zero-shot domain adaptation where each domain is indexed on a multi-dimensional array, and we only have data from a small subset of domains. Our goal is to produce predictors that perform well on unseen domains. We propose a model which consists of a domain-invariant latent representation layer and a domain-specific linear prediction layer with a low-rank tensor structure. Theoretically, we present explicit sample complexity bounds to characterize the prediction error on unseen domains in terms of the number of domains with training data and the number of data per domain. To our knowledge, this is the first finite-sample guarantee for zero-shot domain adaptation. In addition, we provide experiments on two-way MNIST and four-way fiber sensing datasets to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed model.

Cross-Domain Similarity Learning for Face Recognition in Unseen Domains

Cross-Domain Similarity Learning for Face Recognition in Unseen Domains Face recognition models trained under the assumption of identical training and test distributions often suffer from poor generalization when faced with unknown variations, such as a novel ethnicity or unpredictable individual make-ups during test time. In this paper, we introduce a novel cross-domain metric learning loss, which we dub Cross-Domain Triplet (CDT) loss, to improve face recognition in unseen domains. The CDT loss encourages learning semantically meaningful features by enforcing compact feature clusters of identities from one domain, where the compactness is measured by underlying similarity metrics that belong to another training domain with different statistics. Intuitively, it discriminatively correlates explicit metrics derived from one domain, with triplet samples from another domain in a unified loss function to be minimized within a network, which leads to better alignment of the training domains. The network parameters are further enforced to learn generalized features under domain shift, in a model-agnostic learning pipeline. Unlike the recent work of Meta Face Recognition [18], our method does not require careful hard-pair sample mining and filtering strategy during training. Extensive experiments on various face recognition benchmarks show the superiority of our method in handling variations, compared to baseline and the state-of-the-art methods.