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Adversarial Learning of Privacy-Preserving and Task-Oriented Representations

Adversarial Learning of Privacy-Preserving and Task-Oriented Representations Data privacy has emerged as an important issue as data-driven deep learning has been an essential component of modern machine learning systems. For instance, there could be a potential privacy risk of machine learning systems via the model inversion attack, whose goal is to reconstruct the input data from the latent representation of deep networks. Our work aims at learning a privacy-preserving and task-oriented representation to defend against such model inversion attacks. Specifically, we propose an adversarial reconstruction learning framework that prevents the latent representations decoded into original input data. By simulating the expected behavior of adversary, our framework is realized by minimizing the negative pixel reconstruction loss or the negative feature reconstruction (i.e., perceptual distance) loss. We validate the proposed method on face attribute prediction, showing that our method allows protecting visual privacy with a small decrease in utility performance. In addition, we show the utility-privacy trade-off with different choices of hyperparameter for negative perceptual distance loss at training, allowing service providers to determine the right level of privacy-protection with a certain utility performance. Moreover, we provide an extensive study with different selections of features, tasks, and the data to further analyze their influence on privacy protection.

Unseen Object Segmentation in Videos via Transferable Representations

Unseen Object Segmentation in Videos via Transferable Representations In order to learn object segmentation models in videos, conventional methods require a large amount of pixel-wise ground truth annotations. However, collecting such supervised data is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this paper, we exploit existing annotations in source images and transfer such visual information to segment videos with unseen object categories. Without using any annotations in the target video, we propose a method to jointly mine useful segments and learn feature representations that better adapt to the target frames. The entire process is decomposed into two tasks: (1) solving a submodular function for selecting object-like segments, and (2) learning a CNN model with a transferable module for adapting seen categories in the source domain to the unseen target video. We present an iterative update scheme between two tasks to self-learn the final solution for object segmentation. Experimental results on numerous benchmark datasets show that the proposed method performs favorably against the state-of-the-art algorithms.

Fast and Accurate Online Video Object Segmentation via Tracking Parts

Fast and Accurate Online Video Object Segmentation via Tracking Parts Online video object segmentation is a challenging task as it entails to process the image sequence timely and accurately. To segment a target object through the video, numerous CNN-based methods have been developed by heavily finetuning on the object mask in the first frame, which is time-consuming for online applications. In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate video object segmentation algorithm that can immediately start the segmentation process once receiving the images. We first utilize a part-based tracking method to deal with challenging factors such as large deformation, occlusion, and cluttered background. Based on the tracked bounding boxes of parts, we construct a region-of-interest segmentation network to generate part masks. Finally, a similarity-based scoring function is adopted to refine these object parts by comparing them to the visual information in the first frame. Our method performs favorably against state-of-the-art algorithms in accuracy on the DAVIS benchmark dataset, while achieving much faster runtime performance.

Learning to Adapt Structured Output Space for Semantic Segmentation

Convolutional neural network-based approaches for semantic segmentation rely on supervision with pixel-level ground truth, but may not generalize well to unseen image domains. As the labeling process is tedious and labor intensive, developing algorithms that can adapt source ground truth labels to the target domain is of great interest. In this paper, we propose an adversarial learning method for domain adaptation in the context of semantic segmentation. Considering semantic segmentations as structured outputs that contain spatial similarities between the source and target domains, we adopt adversarial learning in the output space. To further enhance the adapted model, we construct a multi-level adversarial network to effectively perform output space domain adaptation at different feature levels. To further improve our method, we utilize multi-level output adaptation based on feature maps at different levels. Extensive experiments and ablation study are conducted under various domain adaptation settings, including synthetic-to-real and cross-city scenarios. We show that the proposed method performs favorably against the state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy and visual quality.